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Parts of England is officially in water shortage after months of scant rainfall

A dry and dry heat spreads across England as a new heat wave arrives, following the driest July in centuries.

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winter is equally dry, as was the one before.

According to Liz Bentley, CEO of the Royal Meteorological Society, there are already worries about how a drought will affect the availability and cost of food.

“There are several crops that are really failing because of either a lack of rainfall; for example, this area’s potato crop depends on rainfall and doesn’t typically use water from other sources to irrigate the fields. And even some of the other crops, like those that use rivers for irrigation, are currently having a pretty difficult time, according to Bentley, who spoke to CNN.

“Even under the current circumstances, yields for a lot of crops will be lower and their prices will rise, and that’s obviously because of the drought in the UK. However, there are other developments taking place in Europe.

The European Drought Monitor has issued drought warnings or alerts for almost 63% of the area in the EU and UK, indicating insufficient soil moisture. That’s roughly the same size as India, or the combined areas of the three largest US states, Texas, Alaska, and California. More severe drought conditions, which impact the vegetation, are present on 17% of the area.

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The nation generally receives the majority of its rain during the autumn or even winter, storing it for the drier periods of the year, but experts are warning that the drought could persist into these seasons. The security of food would be considerably more threatened by another dry winter.

It will continue through the fall, after which we really don’t know. Whether or not we have any big rain—good, continuous rain that tops off water levels—depends, according to Bentley. Heavy, thunderous downpours are not what we need right now because the ground is so dry that the water will simply flow off. It doesn’t permeate the soil.

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