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Black Menaces announce expansion to other college campuses

The Black Menaces, a group of BYU students known for posting videos asking their white classmates questions about race, identity and politics, are expanding.

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The Black Menaces, a group of students well-known for producing films in which they confront their white peers about racial issues, politics, and other topics, are spreading their organization to more colleges and universities around the country.

Since starting their account on TikTok in February, the students, who study at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, have accumulated 725,000 followers. In their recordings, they can be seen posing queries to their white peers, such as “Would you date a bisexual person?” and “What do you do to combat racism?”

The quartet, which consists of Rachel Weaver, Nate Byrd, Kylee Shepherd, Kennethia Dorsey, and Sebastian Stewart-Johnson, revealed the information in a video on Wednesday.

Shepherd says in the video, which is titled “EMAIL US TO START ONE WHEREVER YOU ARE,” “We want a Menace chapter at every mostly white institution and university in the country.”

Stewart-Johnson expounded on the intentions in a recent interview with NBC News, stating that the organization is formally establishing branches at the University of North Carolina, Duke University, Tulane University, and San Francisco State University.

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Students from more than a dozen colleges throughout the nation have already expressed interest, according to Stewart-Johnson.

According to him, the extension is intended to assist the Black Menaces in planning significant demonstrations and advancing causes across the country, such as requiring racial studies education in schools.

In the end, he expressed the hope that the Black Menaces would divide the new chapters into four geographically distinct regions and establish separate TikTok accounts for each region.

In an April interview, Stewart-Johnson stated, “As Black students, we’ve felt the isolation and ‘ostracization’ therefore we wanted to expose everything that we go through in a way that millions could see it.

Those who are being questioned in the Black Menaces TikTok videos frequently seem uneasy. The Menaces, however, argued that it is crucial to get their peers to consider controversial topics like racism, gender identity and expression, and other problems affecting minority groups.

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According to Byrd, “We like to make people feel uncomfortable and give them stuff to think about that they probably haven’t thought about before.”

According to Stewart-Johnson, the inspiration for the Black Menaces stemmed from the fact that he and other Black students frequently felt the need to uplift their friends. The students believed that their efforts to make the school more inclusive as Black Student Union members went unnoticed.

The majority of white students at BYU are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, popularly known as Mormons, and their demographics are similar to those of the church. Six percent of the 16 million Latter-day Saints worldwide as of 2018 were Black.

Many of the group’s TikTok fans already seem enthusiastic about the expansion. Many people mentioned the schools they want the Menaces to bring chapters to in the comment area of the Wednesday announcement.

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