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A living wage has been calculated by the government of the Isle of Man

Since 2017, the Isle of Man has overestimated its wage to a calculation error.

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The Isle of Man Living Wage has historically been inflated due to a calculation error, according to the treasury minister.

Due to the error, the figure had been exaggerated every year since its inception by 80p to £1.24.

According to Alex Allinson, updated estimates place the voluntary wage rate at £11.05 per hour this year, an increase of 18p over 2021.

The “regrettable” error, according to Dr. Allinson, was discovered after a thorough analysis of the calculations.

When the pay was initially computed in 2017 as £8.61, an error was made affecting the expense of having a child in the family.

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It was repeated in the statistics from the succeeding years, and many Manx employers used it to make sure their employees could afford a respectable quality of living.

The revelation of the problem caused a three-month delay in the release of the 2022 report while the technique was fixed before being independently certified by Loughborough University, which will also review subsequent figures.

People should be certain that “as soon as we detected this inaccuracy, we have dealt with it,” Dr. Allinson added.

He noted that measures had been made to guarantee accurate computations in the future.

Dr. Allinson advised enterprises who felt “hurt” after overpaying employees to get in touch with the Cabinet Office, which would handle individual cases.

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Plans to change the current Living Wage amount in the near future have been ruled out because it was computed before inflationary pressures began to increase, he said.

He continued, saying that other measures were being used to combat increases in the cost of living and that the administration intended to retain the perception that the calculation was “statistical, not political.”

Tynwald decided last year to raise the minimum wage, which is now set at £9.50 per hour, to the Living Wage by 2026.

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