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A completely new algorithm can be used to track the health of mental health People could get a reading on their skin and check online in case they ever feel something off is wrong

Researchers at New York University were able to create a “novel inference engine” that monitors brain activity via electrical impulses under the skin. The lead researcher, Associate Professor of Biom

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Quick summary of the plot The Tandon School of Engineering at New York University has developed a “novel inference engine” capable of tracking brain activity through the use of electrical impulses in the skin. Rose Faghih, an associate professor in the department of biomedical engineering, has been working on this project for the past seven years. Brainwaves can be decoded and interpreted in a matter of seconds, as demonstrated in a recent study involving 26 healthy participants.

NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering has made progress toward developing a wearable device for monitoring psychological well-being.

Rose Faghih, an associate professor in the field of biomedical engineering, has spent the past seven years perfecting a method of measuring electrodermal activity (EDA), a form of brain activity that is directly correlated with an individual’s emotional state, via the skin.

In response to various forms of emotional stress, the skin’s electrical properties undergo changes known as electrodermal activity, or EDA. A person’s EDA may shift due to, say, pain, exhaustion, or time pressure at work.

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According to an NYU statement, Faghih and her former PhD student Rafiul Amin have created a novel inference engine that can monitor brain activity through the skin in real time with accuracy and high scalability.

The important task was recently detailed in a publication called Computational Biology.

Faghih’s long-term goal is to design a wearable that can detect when its user is feeling overwhelmed by stress and “nudge” them back to a calmer state of mind.

According to the statement, the unfinished product, dubbed MINDWATCH, could do this by, for instance, playing soothing music when the wearer is experiencing a particularly stressful moment at work.

According to Faghih, “new possibilities for monitoring and improving mental health and cognitive engagement” are made possible by inferring autonomic nervous system activation from wearable devices in real time.

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The new device was successfully tested on a group of 26 healthy individuals, proving its ability to accurately interpret brain signals and provide actionable insights in a matter of seconds.

In addition to influencing a person’s mood, Faghih claims the device has potential medical applications in other areas as well.

Neuropathy, or severe nerve damage that causes numbness, pain, or weakness, is a complication of diabetes that could be diagnosed with the help of this technology.

In response to brain stimulation, the skin conductance-responsive areas of the body are activated via small nerves.

The epidermis can be tested for EDA on a regular basis to check for neuropathy in areas of the body where it is most likely to manifest, such as the hands and feet.

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In the event of neuropathy, the wearer’s tiny nerves would be unable to send any signals to the brain. Keeping an eye on these shifts in brain activity could give doctors insight into the severity of the disease and guide treatment decisions.

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